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that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care, or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to acts. we are a better country -- to action. we are a better country than this. so let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> president went on to say that a so-called deficit of opportunity, interesting phrasing there, is much more important than the fiscal deficit, the yearly fiscal deficit in this country which he points out is actually shrchging in his administration john. >> point out, this issue about the young people are disappointed with president and congress. >> part of the obama coalition that got him elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just thi
health care while talking about higher education and ongoing budget battle. >> more people without insurance gained shurngs, 3 million young americans have been able to stay on their parents plan, more than half a million americans and counting poised to get coverage started on january 1st. some for the very first time. it is these numbers, not the ones in any poll, that will ultimately determine the fate of this law. >> meanwhile, a source familiar with the program confirms to nbc news that 29,000 people signed up the newly repaired healthcare.gov sunday and monday, a figure that surpasses the total for the entire month of october. still not clear how many of them were so-called the young invisibles and over on capitol hill, house republicans continue their focus on the implementation of the law with four separate committee hearings on the affordable care act. nbc news without correspondent peter alexander joins us now. interesting to note, the president has said all along the issue of health care is about the economics as much as it is about what he sees as the right for people t
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> this is "inside story." i'm ray suarez. we have rick seany with fair compare compare, and douglas kidd, and terry trip letter, an aviation analyst who runs a consumer website called "the plane rules." you heard terry trip letter laying out the ways that this could be good for all the stake hold efforts involved, but we have lived through an era of mega mergers. have they done any of the things that terry suggests? >> i'm not sure that they have. the primary benefit that all these mergers have provided is that they've kept carriers in business while they have consolidated. while the carriers are in business, we want them to make money and provide good service there has been to my mind especially among the u.s. carriers a focus more on making money rather than pleasing the passenger . in this with regard we know going to the airport is like going to a carnival where you pay your fe
education are in. for americans the numbers are going in the wrong direction. jonathan betz has the results. these tests show yet again american students are willing. the program for international student assessment tested students from around the world. asian countries were the top scores. the united states didn't crack the top 20. only 9% of american teens scored in the top two levels of maths, compared to shanghai where half the students who tested aced the exam. in maths 29 countries ranked better than america, including germany, u.k., france. but also countries like esownia, slovenia, chubb lick and latvia. for what it's worth, the u.s. outperformed students in mexico, jordan and indonesia. after 12 years of these tests the united states has not improved scores. the education secretary called it a picture of stagnation. >> the u.n. is marking today as international day for persons with disabilities. saying more than 1 billion people, 15% of the world's population live with a disability. the government estimates 19% of people have one, and many are children. some schools use technology
and that education is something that is available to all that we walk towards more pros spert pore young people in the country. when president obama was here a few short months ago, he talked about the ways it has the potential to be an after our strengths are linked to one another. i think that's the best way to memorialize all that he meant to us. >> we know december 15th is when will be the final good-bye, if that's appropriate to say, we'll see each other again, but the final good-bye here. i can't imagine there won't be a television set or radio on where people will gather and watch this moment that will be unmatched as far as the diversity and the range of people who sincerely say that this man changed their life, set the compass of their direction in life. >> that's so true, tamron. during the anti-apartheid moment, we used to chant all the time, the whole world is watching, here again he has made certain that the world world is watching, everyone is pausing and reflecting on what this man meant to us all. we count ourselves blessed to have lived in the shadow of his grace all of these y
behind this education revolution that is happening. also baby seat that has some parents outraged. why they say it is just going too far. >> california man on mission. just how long he plans on ringing that bell. you know it's hard to believe an amazing effort he makes. i'll have the [son] all right,she has no idea. [man] no one told her,right? [son]hi! [mom screams] your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine for challenge butter. and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life. >> most of us had to adapt to the internet but all young people have ever known. so schools are now race to go make children education as modern and connected as the rest of their lives. away from the classroom. and this week that effort got a very big pwingt from 2 of the most influential names in tech. here's jonathan bl
. >> pelley: nelson mandela once said education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. jim axelrod found that message changed the hearts of some american students. >> reporter: when nelson mandela visited madison park high school in roxbury, massachusetts, in 1990 the crowd went wild. eager to hear his words of wisdom. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. >> reporter: a 16-year-old sophomore in the gymnasium that day. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. and at the time that was one of the things that really stuck to my head. so this day i try to instill the same concept in my students. >> reporter: mandela's speech was a turning point in dipina's young life. he decided he too wanted to lead from the classroom as a teacher. >> okay. the word freedom, but freedom is not free. >> reporter: now he's a history teacher at brighton high school in boston, hoping to a model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's suc
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
, some in youth, some -- but all passionate about education, passionate all have resources, all have a voice. why aren't we fixing this? >> i think first of all the greatest issue is recognizing the problem. i don't think this problem is clear 10, 20 years ago. i think when world war ii started our army was smaller than in netherlands. we didn't realize how bad hitler was. how terrible nazi party was. we have to recognize it. i think the phase now we say there's 45 million kids in public school. probably half of them, two-thirds will get a decent education, the rest not so good education. that is not only a problem, it's a tragedy. so i think recognizing a problem and people like yourself who are leaders in that just getting the word off. this is not acceptable. this is bad for everybody. that's the first part. that's starting to happen now. there's several things happening to make it better. i think that's very positive. >> rose: are you convinced that we have the will to do what's she is in the will? >> well, i think -- if more people recognize the problem then they say we can do s
is education. you have more people going to college than ever before, which means more debt, but that doesn't necessarily mean better paying jobs. we're talking about $15 to $20 an hour. do you think raising the minimum wage would have an impact on the way we at least think about education? would more people be less likely to want to go to school if they're getting paid more without having to go? >> i don't think the minimum wage has much of an impact on educational decision. i do think that college is still a good deal, but the reality is that inequality is growing even amongst those who actually go to college. the median college salary is not really keeping pace with the rest of the economy. so again, i think when thinking about the overall picture about inequality, we do need a number of different tools. i think the minimum wage plays one part of that but an important one. >> one of the arguments that corporations like mcdonald's and wendy's in particular like to make is, well, if we raise wages, then we're going to have to raise prices, and you guys don't want that and they throw out th
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
not improved their scors scores muc. the education second called it the picture stagnation. >> and how the u.n. is using drones to keep the peace. >> and you wouldn't believe how much the partridge in a pear tree costs now. >> a dramatic rescue caught on tape. this is the moment a nigerian ship was pulled from under water after spending three days trapped in a tug boat. he shows his hand as he reaches out to alert the rescue diver that he is okay. he managed to survive by breathing in air in an air bubble and the boat overturned while pulling an oil tanker ovef off the coast of nigeria. he is the only survivor of a 12 member crew. >> the united nations has now started using drones. the u.n. says peacekeepers are flying unmanned craft to monitor the activity between rawanda and u began a began beganuganda. james bay has more. >> it's a first taking to the skies the u.n. has fleets of white painted suv's and trucks and helicopters and planes and now the first united nations unmanned aerial ai aircraft more commonly known as a drone. unlike those of the use it's equipped with only a camera not
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
despite calls for government spending on education and unemployment benefits. cheryl: minimum wage watch out for new york and chicago and the joy. fast-food companies demanding $15 an hour.ill hear from them p next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel tt in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. she loves a lot ofas it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that cou be a q
, where is all about? the billions and trillions that we are spending on education and not having any effect. in government isn't working. but we don't entrust how to be in a in a new economic society and that scott said, this has been going on for decades. gerri: to your point, income inequality is growing. 1992, the share of income by the top 5% in 2002, comparing and contrasting. that is not a big change. >> i think that the preponderance of evidence is that income is at the top half versus everyone else over the last two decades. whether that's a problem or not, it is completely unclear when you actually read all of the research that is done on it. and the other point i would make is that within the bottom 80%, the vast majority of the american population, income inequality has grown since the 1980s and in a lot of ways, that is the part that maybe we would be worried about. >> let's talk about one thing that has changed. after the 50s and 60s, when we had productivity, we have the most productive workers in the country and in the world. and in those days productivity was shared b
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
, whether it's a much bigger or more inclusive middle class including blacks, whether it's better education, but you're absolutely right. the project is not finished. in fact, even particularly amongst the blacks, there is a massive income inequality, one of the biggest in the world. very, very poor people still living in shantytowns and the like while there is also at the same time a very rich and exploding black you know, economic super class. so that is an issue. the issue of corruption is still one that's alive and needs to be tackled. and the issue of education still needs to be tackled. he was very keen on the idea of education. but look, many people will say some of the very important things were not done. and they still have to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson,
that were made from inside sandy hook elementary school the day of killed 20 students and six educators. this is after the state prosecutor dropped his fight to continue withholding the calls. he's been ordered to release them. state's attorney stephen sedensky the third had argued that survivors of last december's newtown shooting deserved special protection as victims of child abuse. >> today. authorities are expected to release the results of autopsies on the two bodies recovered from the fiery crash that killed "fast & furious" actor paul walker and his friend.roger rodas. walker's publicist has said the actor was the passenger when rodas' 2005 porsche carrera gt crashed into a light pole and tree and exploded into flames saturday. the families of both men have provided dental records, which will allow not only formal identification of the bodies, but also official word on whether walker or rodas was behind the wheel. three universal pictures will donate a percentage of the proceeds from fast-and- furious six to paul walker's non-profit. walker helped establish "reach out worldwide"
and the courage of those educators who were on the speed of what happened. >> i went to president to newtown, and the grief was tangible. it was a physical thing you could feel. it is difficult to talk about even right now. in the last few weeks, there was an information, there was haunting details from the shooter who was clearly a young man suffering from sight mental health issues, and yet his mother, nancy lanza kept weapons in the house, took her son to the shooting range, she even planned to buy him a gun for christmas last year. she says, quote, you would want treatment for someone like that. he was isolated from everyone but his mother, and she did not have the understanding. i know it is sensitive because she is the one that he killed that day, but is that mother correct? should nancy lanza have stepped up more? >> nancy lanza probably needed help herself. and it certainly, as a parent, of four children, i can speak eternally about the challenges of parenting. not in this kind of situation, but easy to say in hindsight what she should have done. the point is what society should have
public. nbc news has chosen not to broadcast the tapes. our chief education correspondent did listen to them today to see if they reveal anything new. good evening. >> good evening. a judge ruled just last week that while these calls could be a searing reminder of the horror on that awful day they could also support the professionalism and bravery of the adults involved. though the seven recordings made public included very little new information about what happened, what struck me is how calm everyone seemed during this ordial, still, when you look at the faces of those innocent people, you understand why the release of the 911 calls is not only so sensitive to those who lost loved ones but also the entire newtown community. we heard from two teachers. both sounded remarkably calm in front of the children. we also heard from a custodian who stayed on the line with police through the ordeal. you could hear gunshots in the background as he spoke. but what did you not hear was chaos or screaming or children's voices. while many parents did not want these tapes to be released, i did spe
-old university student said had mandela had not made those choices he would not be getting the education he is getting. so many people calling and commenting on how if mandela had not been the man that he was, this country could have very easily ended up like syria or iraq. another policeman we were speaking to this morning saying with nelson mandela's passing he felt he had lost a part of his soul and a part of his body and that he truly hopes moving forward the country and its leaders will remember what it was that this incredible man stood for. john? >> it is so remarkable. arwa damon, thank you. she brings up such a good point. words like legend don't begin to cut when twhen you deal with nelson mandela. when you're in south africa he is more than a leader and more than a legend. he's in the fabric of that nation and some one's sole they carry a piece of him around. >> a very interesting point given what we know is going on in the middle east now the connection she made the country could have ended you up differently if it wasn't for his sacrifices. >> no way inevitable there would not
're gonna give people what here to take care of the spread we would try to do more education and enforcement. >> within a few minutes, the police was on the scene and educated. >> you are not suppose to enter into right here. there is a line in the street to tell you. >> there in force in the role of the bike lanes. maligned these dedicated bike lanes are for bicyclist on less, one you are about to park and you cannot crews looking for a spot. you cannot emerge when there is a break in the by claimed similar to this. >> muni buses are not allowed to use the biplanes to keep on schedule. bike lanes, are for bikes. >> this guy gave me a piece of his mind. >> i teach a the university. i am serious about the spread i do not see you be a part of the solution. >> there you have it, he was driving e illegally and he got a ticket and he stated it was my fault. >> since no matter where you want to put the blame on, the lost a lot. maligned >> as san francisco, still the robbers, kron4 milin san fry roberts kron 4 news. >> coming up on the kron4 morning news. batkid is making his return to san francis
with me at this time fond memories of systematic education, patient, calculated, measured, to ensure that we begin to appreciate that struggle is not just about emotional drive, but that we need it to learn the tactics that would make us [ inaudible ] to fight us, and enable us to survive through thick and thin. >> reporter: on the streets where he lived during apartheid people gathered too. this was a hot bed of -- [ technical difficulties ] >> he is a hero to all around the world. everyone is very sad right now because he is gone. >> reporter: many people here say they will celebrate his life. millions of south africans won't be able to attend the state funeral, but they plan to say farewell in their own way. they say they are going to line the streets all across south africa and say farewell to the father of the nation and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >>> the death of nelson mandela is also hitting home. communities across the u.s. are paying tribute
access to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hossa. he started to see himself and how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. and i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being, and full of the idea that he was on a journey and he had something to do. he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there is an old spirit, an old song which is -- ♪ i'm on my journey now mount zion and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion ♪ he was on a journey and he knew it, and he had something to do, and this is what each of us has. if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey. i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, a south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. you said your husband and mandela were rivals but that didn't matter. tell us about that experience. >> their were rivals but when nelson mandela came to visit, he never
-paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 in manufacturing. 17,000 construction jobs. so they're coming in the right places. they're coming slower than people wanted, but don't forget. we came from a very, very dark place. and so the light is starting to shine. >> the unemployment picture is encouraging for a lot of people. for men the rate is 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but really discouraging for african-americans. 12.5% don't have a job. and look at teenagers. nearly 21% are out of work. nationwide, long-term unemployment is not improving. more than 4 million people have been out of work for six months or longer. still, eye glass designer warby parker is hiring. software engineers and retail employees. >> we're currently planning for 2014. looks like we'll hire about 150 people next year. >> reporter: tonight reason for optimism with the unemployment rate the lowest in five years. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> and on this friday night, there's much more still ahead for us including the americans touched by mandela during his time in america. >>> nelson mandela was sent
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
it is the soweto ymca. >> i'll get a job. >> what kind of job? >> educating people. >> it is a rather modern area today. >> it was hard times. >> thanks to nelson mandela. >> thanks to nelson mandela. >> thanks to nelson mandela south africa's fight it kept mostly inside the ring. >> right here all of this. this is the equipment that nelson mandela wants to use. outback the security guard shows equipment that nelson mandela used. memories of a boxer that shows a different fight and why. >> president obama arrives in south africa on tuesday for what has been called the african funeral. 100,000 people are expected to attend the memorial attendance in johannesburg. part of nelson mandela's mandate was his willingness to forgive. one of his former guards said he couldn't help but become close. nelson mandela was my prisoner. he was my friend. like a father to me. he was someone you could look up to. i will miss him as a country and i will miss his voice. >> that was christo brand, nelson mandela's prison guard for 12 years, until his release in 1990. >> tsangses heating up over disputed islands in th
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. >> the education of this president is a subtracting and moving process as it was this week as he continues with the scent of profound government. bill: brit hume is our political analyst. >> i got a chuckle out of that. bill: what did you think of that observation? >> the president said something about people blowing their money in las vegas, and then somewhat later he said it again in las vegas is hurting and need the business. and this is why you don't have to be a governor to know and understand and it operates slowly behind this technologically and otherwise. and no executive experience. so we have gotten to travel within this along the learning curve. bill: there are these agencies that are outdated with the structure of a lot of these agencies, reform is hard to do and a lot of these programs and activities have constituencies and so on and it's hard to change it. and i think most people intuitively understand that in this is the health and human services program that basically kind of left it alone and didn't put this in overall charge of a for at that time. bill: the hhs or irs, al
was familiar with howard and the extent to which howard had anticipated in african education the same as the university of ft. hayre has participated in african education in east and central africa. that was a very smooth relationship for the two universities and i went there as a result set up an office, howard university, to help put in place collaboration between our university and university at howard. the bottom line of that was that we at howard established what we call the south african research and archive al project to study the anti-apartheid movement in the united states. >> dr. harris, what would you say is the legacy, the dual legacy, of nelson mandela both in south africa and in this country? and i guess i'm asking that specificically because you sort of had a bird's eye view of what he was able to do in the country and what he was able to create by extension, by reaching out to howard university to say we want there to be some role here in what happens with south africa going forward. >> well, we were very excited when he came because everyone knew about him. in respons
was absolutely passionate about education, and he had a great affinity with children, because remember, 27 years in prison, he hardly saw a child. and it was the one thing he said he really missed was the touch of a child. so he paid a lot of attention to the youth. and as you say, democracy here in south africa, the anniversary of those first democratic elections is next year, it was 20 years ago. so a lot of people, a lot of these people here didn't know apartheid, didn't know about the feel, the indignities of it, but they still know that nelson mandela made sacrifices for them. and the key is -- and he was very, very passionate about it -- he wanted his legacy to live on way after he had gone. and dethat he did that, "you ca like me in a small way. it's not hard to be nelson mandela. just pay attention to the people close to you and keep on trying hard and never give up." that in a way is his legacy. >> and they are living his legacy out. robin, thank you. appreciate it. >> reporter: okay. >>> one of the icons of new york honored nelson mandela last night. look at this. the top of the empire
to put our children first and create situations in which we push not just the children but the educators that sur ound them. too many of us are comfortable with mediocrity. as michelle said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped, we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> frank talk from steve perry and michelle reed on this important issue. >>> we have much more ahead in the cnn newsroom and it all starts right now. i am fredricka whitfield. ice, sleet, snow, a cold snap hits much of the u.s., knocking out power for hundreds of thousands of people. and plunging central parts of the country into bone chilling cold. we're going live to the heart of the storm next. >>> and home at last after six weeks locked up in north korea, an elderly u.s. war veteran suddenly free. he is now back home. and we just heard from him last hour. >>> plus, after ineffective chemotherapy and failed bone marrow transplant, this 15-year-old leukemia patient thought he would die. then an experimental treatment changed everything. details coming up. >>> merrill newman ba
. connecticut officials have tried to block them to protect families of the 20 children and 6 educators who were killed on that day. but they decided not to appeal after a court ruled to make those recordings public. >>> and now, to detroit, where the judge who approved the city's entrance into bankruptcy is calling that move an opportunity for a fresh start. the motor city now mustard its $18 billion debt. the judge's decision was opposed by the city's unions, pension funds and retirees who claim that the mindful of that, the judge says he will not sign off on just any proposed cut. >>> the nation's capital is a little brighter for the rest of the year after getting an annual touch of holiday glitz. >> house speaker john boehner flipping the switch on the capitol christmas tree. it's a spruce, adorned by ornaments made by kids across the country. >>> which state curses the most? the results are in. >> interesting. >>> plus, a california ceo and his family vanished. the frantic search for their plane after it seemed to disappear from the skies. >>> and what billy joel is planning to do every mon
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
education because people who get, in the middle east get a decent education don't automatically sign up for the 7th century. the second problem was, of course it, when president obama utterly failed to take any retaliatory action after the slaughter of our ambassador and three other americans in benghazi last year, it became open season on americans. so it was really own a matter of time until this truly heroic, quietly heroic young man's life was cut short. bill: i want to make this point clear. we do not know if he was a victim of a crime or if he was truly targeted by islamists in benghazi 24 hours ago. but more to the point about what islamists do not like about werners teaching people in their country is what, colonel? >> well, you know, modern science and chemistry doesn't match the philosophies and religious beliefs the middle ages, it just doesn't but there's this, call this mad rage against things western even as terrorists are welcome willing to use our technologies. but bill, i have to say two things. i don't believe this young man was target of a robbery type crime because h
and their life. beyond toys. they also contribute to their nieces and nephews education and take them on trips, even if it can be on the verge. >> i'm a bit worried i'm turning my knees into a clothes horse. >> of the problem and i'm fully responsible. no word if any on cold word is coming out just yet and i guess punk?ould be [laughter] >> i will tell you how much i spent because my husband could be watching for my two nephews and my niece but they will get hooked up as christmas. >> you are not spoiling them? , a police officer's brave move to save a teddy bear. watch as he's returns the prized toy to the grateful owner. >> we will soon know where the fbi will build its new headquarters sparking a battle between neighbors. >> taking >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5 on your side. >> operations are underway for possible winter weather. >> to our west, millions are hunkered down to whether that might be the worst ice storm in years. >> good afternoon. when the storm hit last night, you could see that there's already ice coating all of the trees, it was very slippery to walk around and the ki
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> that's our news for now. the "tonight show" is next. >> we leigh you with the sights and sounds of the christmas tree lighting down on the elipse. good night, everybody. ♪ >> announcer: it's "the tonight show with jay leno," featuring rickey minor and "the tonight show" band. tonight, jay welcomes -- president george w. bush, the music of ben harper with charlie musselwhite and "jaywalking." and now, jay leno! [ cheers and applause ] ♪ [ cheers and applause ] >> jay: thank you very much! [ cheers and applause ] welcome to "the tonight show." oh, boy. getting ready for thanksgiving?
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. >>> a sheriff in south carolina refuses to lower the u.s. flag in honor of nelson mandela. sheriff clark has a reason. >> he said it should be reserved for american citizens. he said this honor should be reserved for american citizens. take a listen. >> show a sign of respect for what nelson mandela is doing. but in our country it should be the people. >> he went onto say that it should be lowered at the u.s. embassy and he is receiving overwhelming support. take a look at these fac
or not it could be done. >> we're talking on skilled, under educated people. we are talking about a debate where you have mcdonald's pay them but is the franchisee. mcdonald's did make a lot a money is so that is the corporation. it is not an easy debate to six. i myself, for the record, yahoo did a survey and a lot of people are saying not to raise it. with that they said obviously, it is frustrating to work for $7.25 an hour. but when i was young, mcdonald's was the way for you to get out of your home, meet someone and get ready for college. it was not meant to be a steady job. >> the democrats are pushing for higher minimum wage it will be interesting and 2014. we do not want to go down that way and we do not want to unionize festival. cities that did not have minimum-wage, they are thriving on a free-market system. you have to be educated. is just tough. >> this will be very interesting. >> i know i will get a lot of people that will come out of facebook and said they do not agree. >> you see berkeley did a study. they did a study and wal-mart of how much money that their workers are getting
saw it and were going to get some folks out here take care of it with and do a little education >> and with a few minutes siren sfpd solos were on the scene educating nats: and if you look at the spot right here you are not suppose to enter till right here how do you tell the difference there is a line right there in the street right there maligned and enforcing the rules of the bike lanes. nats: all the way to the right >> these dedicated bike lanes are for bicylist unless you are about to park but you can't cruse the bike lane looking for a spot you can only merge when there is a break in the bike lanes a break simiilar to this muni buses are not allowed to use the bike lanes to keep on schedule bike lanes are for bikes >> this guy gave me a piece of his mind after being caught in the bike and receiving a >> i teach journalism at the univeristy and im serious about this i don't see you being part of the solution i see you getiing some good film. so there you have it he was diving illegally in the bike lane and it's my fault . >> state law prohibits people from driving in the b
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